Pretty cauliflower makes pretty ok pizza – Romanesco Cauliflower

Mysterious veggies | September 30, 2013 | By

Hey, you know what’s fun to do if you’re babysitting someone’s kids? It’s kind of a good time to experiment on them.

I was watching two super cute little lab rats … I mean … yeah … this weekend. They were super happy watching Scooby Doo with my younguns, and I was super happy messing about in the kitchen. It was a win win.

A few days before, I had picked up this lovely looking fractal from our neighborhood organic grocer. That’s a math inside joke I guess – the little bits are microcosms of the whole or some such thing. I seem to remember a lecture about that from a science degree I’ve almost entirely forgotten.

Roman cauliflowerAt first I thought it was a broccoflower, and since I had never tried one, my weird food antennae perked up. I thought that finding a broccoflower there was odd, though, since making a broccoflower requires a love connection between broccoli and cauliflower, and that didn’t sound very organic to me. The organic lady assured me that no, it was just a different type of cauli. Who knew that they naturally come in orange, purple and green, and that the more colours the better, nutritionally speaking. It figures I’ve been eating the white bread of cauliflower my whole life.

Anyway, back to the cute little guinea pigs. I’d heard from gluten free types that you can make pizza using a cauliflower crust. I was suspicious. Those types often struggle to make food that tastes good, even though they swear it’s identical. You know you’ve had a chewy muffin or two. Yeah. So I figured I’d try it, and if kids couldn’t tell the difference, I’d apologize to any and all gluten frees I’d ever met. Maybe I’d even convert. Chug the gluten free koolaid.

Luckily for my love of wheat, the romanesco cauliflower pizza wasn’t the best thing since sliced bread (its name also does zero for my search engine rankings). It stuck horribly to the foil I cooked it on, even though I oiled it first. As for the taste, my daughter gagged. I was kind of proud, actually – let me know I haven’t been a failure as a mother in my attempts to shove vitamins down her throat previously. She can sniff them out and reject them immediately, no matter how they might be disguised. My other kid house guests showed zero interest in the pizza, even though it looked quite like pizza and was covered in cheese. Maybe I had sabotaged it with the appetizer of chocolate chip cookies. I’m a very good babysitter, BTW.

The romanesco cauli was pretty cool looking, but it tasted pretty much like a normal cauliflower. Use it for other cauli recipes. I like to deflower cauli (ha), toss it with a lot of olive oil, kosher salt, pepper, and a tbsp of curry powder in a bowl, and then roast it on a baking sheet at 400 for about 45 minutes.

Here is the recipe I used in case you want to try it yourself. For what it’s worth, when the adults got home they all ate the pizza and loved it. Here is the recipe I was looking for at Midwesternbite (one of my fav blogs) but couldn’t find at the time I was cooking for some reason. And here are the pics!

Oh yeah, forgot my highly scientific rating system Rating: 1 Yum. It didn’t completely suck, but if I’m going to indulge in a pizza, I might just give Domino’s a call. Which is a lie, because as far as I know, no one around here actually eats Domino’s, but I thought it was an appropriate pizza common ground that any reader might identify with.

1-IMG_5053

Cauli as a grain (post processor)

Cauli as a grain (post processor)

Baked cauliflower crust

Baked cauliflower crust

Oil your pan, people

Oil your pan, people

Kid friendly romanesco cauli pizza

Kid friendly romanesco cauli pizza

 

Comments

    • Leave a Reply

      Ann Allchin
      October 1, 2013

      Okay weird! Ha ha just kidding. My husband ate and liked it, and he usually complains vocally about cauliflower. And I’m waiting for the mom of the kids to comment, because she really liked it too. Mine turned out far too thin though, because I had to scrape so much of it off to remove it from the foil. So maybe I should give it another go! If you have a real problem with wheat, it would definitely be a great option.

  1. Leave a Reply

    Joanna @ Midwestern Bite
    October 2, 2013

    Thanks for the shout out! And for pointing out I need to have Mike add that recipe to the recipe page. I guess the goat picture at the top of the post threw him off.

    I have found that the weird crust pizzas do better on one of those Silpat’s. Comes off much nicer. I have also found that adding pepperoni to the top throws people off from the weird crust.

    I wanna say I bought a packet of seeds once for this weirdly shaped veggie but never got around to growing them. It is cool looking isn’t it?

    • Leave a Reply

      Ann Allchin
      October 2, 2013

      Ooh, a silpat. New kitchen gear…and…I’m in.
      I knew there must be a trick! How thick do you make yours? Mine was too thin. Toppings would have kicked it up a notch for sure.

      And the cauli was definitely pretty. Photogenic!

  2. Leave a Reply

    Trish
    October 8, 2013

    I thought it was delicious!! I really did. I’m shocked those lil buggers of mine didn’t try it 🙂

    • Leave a Reply

      Ann Allchin
      October 8, 2013

      Ha! I bet if any kid was hungry enough they’d probably think they were amazing. Ours are just too well fed, that’s all. 🙂

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